One of the common misconceptions about ADHD is that it occurs only in children. The reality is that ADHD can affect people of all ages. It is estimated that in the United States alone, nearly 8 million adults have ADHD. While inattentiveness, impulsivity, and hyperactivity are the same hallmark features of both child and adult ADHD, these symptoms often manifest quite differently in adults. For example, hyperactivity in the child may be excessive running and climbing, while in the adult it is driving too fast. Impulsivity in the child can show up as blurting out answers in class, whereas for the adult interrupting colleagues during a business meeting would be likely. Recognition of the symptoms of ADHD that impact everyday life—at home, at work, and socially—is critical. The good news is that adult ADHD is a treatable medical condition, when recognized and addressed with an eye toward optimal management. Current data suggests that further continuing education and professional development is warranted to address clinical practice gaps related to diagnosis and management of ADHD in adults. In this neuroscienceCME Live and On Demand activity, expert faculty will explore best evidence to help clinicians achieve best practice as it relates to assessment, diagnosis, and management of adult ADHD. This activity also includes a special "After the Show" segment during which the faculty answers additional audience questions in an informal Q&A session.

One of the common misconceptions about ADHD is that it occurs only in children. The reality is that ADHD can affect people of all ages. It is estimated that in the United States alone, nearly 8 million adults have ADHD. While inattentiveness, impulsivity, and hyperactivity are the same hallmark features of both child and adult ADHD, these symptoms ... Show more

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