Shakespeare was passionately interested in the history of Rome, as is evident from plays like Titus Andronicus, Julius Caesar, and Antony and Cleopatra. His tragedy Coriolanus was probably written around 1605-07, and dramatizes the rise and fall of a great Roman general, Caius Martius (later surnamed Coriolanus because of his military victory at Corioli). This play is unusual in that it provides a strong voice for the ordinary citizens of Rome, who begin the play rioting about the high price of food, and who continually clash with Coriolanus because of his contempt for plebians. (Summary by Elizabeth Klett) CastCaius Martius Coriolanus: thebicyclethiefCitizen: Patti CunninghamFirst Citizen/Second Officer/Second Patrician: Chuck WilliamsonCominius: Bob GonzalezFifth Citizen: AvailleFirst Conspirator/First Officer/Lieutenant/Second Senator/Second Servingman: ToddFirst Lord/Sixth Citizen: Tricia GFirst Senator: DublinGothicFirst Servingman: Leonard WilsonFirst Soldier/Herald: John FrickerGentlewoman/Second Soldier/Third Lord/Young Coriolanus: Martin GeesonJunius Brutus: Ron AltmanMenenius Agrippa: Algy PugRoman/Second Conspirator/Seventh Citizen: KristingjSecond Citizen: Peter MakusSecond Lord: Chuck DonovanSicinius Velutus: Ric FThird Citizen: Joshua LetchfordThird Conspirator: Heather PhillipsThird Roman: Lucy PerryTitus Lartius/Aedile: Delmar H. DolbierTullus Aufidius: Arielle LipshawValeria: Tiffany Halla ColonnaVirgilia: Amy L. GramourVolsce: Max KorlingeVolumnia: Elizabeth KlettNarrator: Diana MajlingerOther roles (crowd voices, etc) read by members of the company.Audio edited by Elizabeth Klett

Shakespeare was passionately interested in the history of Rome, as is evident from plays like Titus Andronicus, Julius Caesar, and Antony and Cleopatra. His tragedy Coriolanus was probably written around 1605-07, and dramatizes the rise and fall of a great Roman general, Caius Martius (later surnamed Coriolanus because of his military victory at C... Show more

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